The Check-Up Inspection Report

Forewarned is forearmed is said to mean that if you know about something before it happens, you can be prepared for it.

Why carry out periodic Inspection reports?

The Inspection Report is an important part of the relationship between the tenant, landlord, and agent as it looks at the condition of the property its contents and any issues there may be during the tenancy to ensure the property remains in good condition.

Forewarned is forearmed...

Forewarned is forearmed is said to mean that if you know about something before it happens, you can be prepared for it.  That’s what makes an interim-inspection important to protect the property, the tenant and the landlord.

It’s an important part of the relationship between the tenant, landlord, and agent as it looks at the condition of the property, its contents and any issues there may be.

It can also be used to identify if any of the property requires repair, restoration, maintenance or redecoration and if noted will be reported back to the landlord.  As with all IAM Inventories photographs will accompany this inspection.

IAM Inventories recommend that interim inspections take place every three months during the first year of the tenancy and reducing on a sliding scale depending on the type of property and length of tenancy.

Check-up inspections help to ensure problems don’t get any worse and make sure the landlord doesn’t get a nasty shock at the end of the tenancy.

They also help with planned maintenance works such as issues with damp and mold, and can immediately address important problems to stop them escalating.

Known changes also happen to the Property Inventory and Schedule of Condition items during the tenancy.

It is possible that you will add and remove Property Inventory and Schedule of Condition items or you might carry out decorative or structural alterations.

You may replace the garage door or change the boiler.  Whatever changes occur these must be noted as an amendment to the original Property Inventory and Schedule of Condition, attached to the document on a separate sheet and agreed in writing between the landlord and the tenant.

Similarly, if the landlord agrees that the tenant can carry out works himself, such as decorating one of the rooms, you should record in detail the colour (including a swatch) that you have agreed along with the terms of how you want the tenant to carry out the work and what should happen if the decoration is not to the required standard. It should also be agreed and recorded whether the redecorated room should be returned to the original colour, or remain, at check-out time.

These agreements must be signed by both parties and attached to the original Property Inventory and Schedule of Condition as an addendum.

 

3 more inventories to complete the set

The check-in inventory is more than a tick-list, it's where each item is checked against the property inventory and the tenant's agreement is recorded.
Accurate check-out inventory reports record the changes and any dilapidation that has occurred in the property during the tenancy.
A properly prepared and comprehensive property inventory sets the scene for what is provided by the landlord at the start of the tenancy.

READY TO BE FOREWARNED & SAVE MONEY?

Regular check-ups are an important part of the relationships between all interested parties as they look at the condition of the property, its contents and any issues there may be. Planned maintenance helps the landlord budget accordingly and the tenant is reassured that you have their best interests at heart.